Student Readers

A reader is a collection of copyright-compliant readings, to expand a student’s knowledge and understanding. Where readings are deemed essential they must be readily available in an alternate format free of charge*.
In order for a booklet to be produced and sold as a reader, it must:

  •  Contain only readings relevant to that course
  •  Be copyright compliant prior to printing
  •  Not contain material, readings or information required for completion of the course, unless those are readily available in an alternate format free of charge
  •  Not contain course teaching materials such as contact or location details, tutorial outlines, PowerPoint slides, study guides, course information, lecture notes or assessment schedules

If the contents of a booklet are expanded to contain teaching or administrative material, it is no longer considered a reader. It must still be copyright compliant and must be provided free of charge.*Making a reading available online is assessed as making it readily available under the Act as long as students are not required to bring it in hard copy in class; however if it is not available online, then the number of hard copies of the reading or reader in the library must be sufficient for the numbers of students in the course to have ready access to it.

The Commonwealth Higher Education Support Act 2003 (HESA) contains requirements that apply to incidental fees and charges, including readers, but not to materials that are given away free of charge.

The Commonwealth Copyright Act 1968 (Copyright Act) applies to anything that is communicated or reproduced, including materials that are given away free of charge, or supplied in any format.

Under HESA, the University is required to make copies of readers available via the Library. The number of copies available in the Library will be calculated by UniPrint based on a formula relating to the number of enrolments (to a maximum of 5 per campus library). These copies must be paid for by the School.

Under HESA, the University is prohibited from generating revenue from the sale of readers. The price of a reader must only represent the costs directly associated with its production and distribution. Readers must be ordered through UniPrint. The price charged to students will include the cost of formatting (where required), printing, binding, lodging digital copies with the Library DRMC, digital compliance checking, conversion and cataloguing of the digital copies to make them available to students online and delivery of readers to Co-Op bookshops.

Requirements under the Copyright Act are complex, and staff are advised to consider copyright requirements before they begin preparing resources. The university's copyright website has a detailed manual to assist staff prepare copyright compliant teaching and learning resources. If in doubt, staff are strongly advised to ask for assistance.

Part VB of the Copyright Act permits the University to copy or communicate limited amounts of literary works (published text), artistic works (images, photos, tables, diagrams) and music in written form, but specifically excludes computer programs and computer manuals. In summary staff can copy:

  • One chapter or 10% of the total pages from a book, report or other literary work: whichever is greater;
  • Up to 15 pages of each work from an anthology (including conference proceedings; published editions of collected works or collections of readings or essays);
  • One or more articles on the same specific topic from a periodical (a single issue of a journal, newspaper of magazine);
  • 10% from a musical work in written form (sheet music).

Staff can copy the whole or part of a literary, dramatic, musical or artistic work (excluding a periodical) if a new copy is not available within a reasonable time at an ordinary commercial price. This provision may be used to copy the whole of an out-of-print text, but staff need to check with the publisher (and retain evidence) to make sure that no reprints are planned within the reasonable times i.e. six months for text books and 30 days for other material.

Staff can copy whole artistic works, including diagrams, photos, maps, technical drawings and some tables, which have not been separately published in hard-copy and are not available for purchase at a reasonable price within a reasonable period of time (e.g. as a poster or post card from a gallery).

The copyright requirements for printed and digital material are different. A reader may be approved for print but only some of the readings able to be displayed online via the DRMC of the Library. Contact the University Copyright Coordinator for more information.

The Consolidated Commonwealth Grant Scheme Guidelines of the Higher Education Support Act 2003 specify that the University cannot levy a charge unless:

  1. The charge is for a good or service that is not essential to a course of study; or
  2. The charge is for an alternative form or alternative forms of, access to a good or service that is an essential component of a course but is otherwise made readily available at no additional charge by the higher education provider; or
  3. The charge is for an essential good or service that the student has the choice of acquiring from a supplier other than the higher education provider and is for:
        1. equipment or items which become the physical property of the student and are not consumed during the course of study; or
        2. food, transport and accommodation costs associated with the provision of field trips.
  4. A higher education provider may charge a student a fine or a penalty if the fine or penalty is imposed principally as a disincentive and not in order to raise revenue or cover administrative costs. Textbooks are covered under part (3) above and therefore must have an ISBN number and be available from commercial sources external to the university.

Under the Copyright Act and the University's subsequent license agreements, readers can only be sold and/or distributed to enrolled UniSA students, not to external organisation or individuals. Staff teaching UniSA courses to students from another organisation such as SABIT may provide that organisation with the suggested list of readings, and then that organisation must copy and distribute them under their own license agreements.

The manifest located in the footer of every course home page must be completed for materials sent to external students. Materials are printed by UniPrint and distributed by the Flexible Learning Centre, with the costs charged to the School. As the students are not charged additional fees for the materials, the HESA does not apply. However; all materials must be copyright compliant.

There are three options for making a reader available for offshore students:

  1. print in Australia and ship overseas; or
  2. provide a reference list to a partner so that they can make it available (subject to their law, which tends to be more restrictive than the Australian Copyright Act); or
  3. only use digital compliant readings catalogued via the Library's DRMC.

Readers produced in Australia for distribution overseas must comply with the Australia Commonwealth Copyright Act and subsequent licences purchased by the university, as with onshore readers. If a reader is stored digitally on a CD or disk (or equivalent) the content must be compliant with the digital copyright requirements.

Staff are not to send an original hard copy or a PDF (or equivalent) on a disk or CD to an overseas printer for production.

EXAMPLE

Course A is taught to internal students at Whyalla and City West, students enrolled through SABIT, external students and students offshore. The course coordinator has developed a Course Information Booklet (CIB), a study guide, a reader and copies of PowerPoint slides used in lectures.

STUDENT GROUP REQUIREMENTS

Internal onshore

City West and Whyalla

The Course Outline must be provided free of charge in hard copy to all internal students. The reader must be printed at UniPrint and will be sold via Campus Central at City West and Whyalla. UniPrint will also ensure that it is catalogued in the Library DRMC, who will ensure it is available in the City West and Whyalla libraries. The reader is subject to HESA as it is being sold. Students cannot, therefore, be required to buy the reader. The study guide and PowerPoint slides can be provided online. They must not form part of the reader. They are considered required teaching materials under the HESA if students are told to bring them to classes (and therefore should be provided free of charge in hard copy). All materials must be copyright compliant.
Offshore (partner)

There are three options for making a reader available for offshore students:

  1. print in Australia and ship overseas; or
  2. provide a reference list to the partner so that they can make it available; or
  3. only use digitally compliant readings catalogued via the Library DRMC.

Readers produced in Australia for distribution overseas must comply with the Australian Commonwealth Copyright Act and subsequent licenses purchased by the University, as with onshore readers. If a reader is stored digitally on a CD or disk (or equivalent) the content must be compliant with the digital copyright requirements.

Staff are not to send an original hard copy on a PDF (or equivalent) on a disk or CD to an overseas printer for production. Materials not subject to copyright (e.g. study guides and PowerPoint slides) can be provided according to the terms of any agreements about intellectual property. HESA does not apply to transnational students (unless they are a domestic student or they come onshore, at which point they are considered an FPOS student).

SABIT Any materials or resources that are only able to be communicated by virtue of the UniSA copyright licenses cannot be given or sold to SABIT students. This includes required or supplementary readings, the reader, or any other copyrighted material. Therefore the list of readings must be given to SABIT so it is available under their own licenses. Materials not subject to copyright (e.g. study guides and PowerPoint slides) can be provided according to the terms of any agreements about intellectual property.