Export

Sending goods to a local facility, interstate or internationally, incurs different risks. Professional judgement is paramount when assessing those risks and engaging with procedures to contain and manage them.

Before exporting any goods within Australia you should check with domestic quarantine in particular for any specific border restrictions.

Exportation of some goods is prohibited outright but most can be exported under specified conditions. Before exporting a biological, check for specific conditions through the Department of Agriculture and Water Resources. The Department of Industry, Innovation and Science website is also really useful.

The export of tangible (physical) and intangible (electronic) goods, technology and information overseas may also be subject to Defence Export Controls. Severe penalties apply if goods subject to these controls are exported without a permit. Refer to the Strengthened Export Controls section for more details.

Steps to follow when exporting goods:

If exporting within Australia:

  1. Check that there are no local restrictions on the goods to be exported.
  2. Check whether a Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) is required before arranging for export or transfer of goods. This is particularly important to cover such things as ownership of goods, IP, licensing and any costs associated with the transport of goods. To develop a MTA contact your local Academic Unit business development team who will provide assistance.
  3. Check that the receiver of the goods has all the correct approvals to receive the goods.
  4. Ensure a copy of the Import Approval/ Permit (if required) has also been obtained.
  5. If you are exporting a Genetically Modified Organism (GMO) interstate then obtain a copy of their Institutional Biosafety Committee approval (or Office of Gene Technology Regulator licence/approval) for Dealing with the GMO.

If exporting overseas:

  1. Check that there are no restrictions on the goods to be exported including quarantine, dangerous goods (see Transfer of Goods) and Defence Export Controls (see Strengthened Export Controls for more details). In some instances investigation of the requirements for the import of the goods into the receiving country may be necessary.
  2. Check whether a Material Transfer Agreement (MTA) is required before arranging for export of goods. This is particularly important to cover such things as ownership of goods, IP, licensing and any costs associated with the transport of goods. To develop a MTA contact your local Academic Unit business development team who will provide assistance.
  3. Obtain a copy of the Import Permit issued to the receiver from their quarantine or other appropriate authority.
  4. If exporting a GMO overseas then you will need a copy of any approvals which may be required as part of the regulation of GMOs in that country.
  5. In addition to these requirements it may be necessary to get copies of other permissions or permits from the receiver before any goods can be exported.
  6. Remember to complete an Australian Customs Export Declaration Notice (B957). Any permits or permissions are to be produced to a Collector of Customs before exportation.

If you have any queries please contact:

Ethics & Integrity
Research and Innovation Services
GP2-09
Mawson Lakes Campus
biosafety@unisa.edu.au